This Is Bad: People Are Making Tiny Trump Photos To Annoy The President

November 13, 2019
There have been photos with Trump With Extremely Long Ties, Frog-Chinned Trump, and Trump With Very Tiny Hands… Obviously, the next logical step is to photoshop Donald Trump as a toddler.

This Is Bad: People Are Making Tiny Trump Photos To Annoy The President This Is Bad: People Are Making Tiny Trump Photos To Annoy The President Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Jennifer Aniston: “I and all the Trump supporter celebrities decided to make a pro-Trump company named “Celebrities For Trump,”

November 13, 2019
Jennifer Aniston: “I and all the Trump supporter celebrities decided to make a pro-Trump company named “Celebrities For Trump,” which will fight against all anti-Trump celebrities, I think President Trump needs our support”

Another Trump’s celebrity supporter, Tim Allen, discussed the hypocrisy of Hollywood liberals, who he noted constantly complained about Trump being a “bully,” but now are the ones doing the bullying of the tiny minority of Trump supporters who work alongside them.

“What I find odd in Hollywood is that they didn’t like Trump because he was a bully. But if you had any kind of inkling that you were for Trump, you got bullied for doing that. And … it gets a little bit hypocritical to me,”

On the other hand, actress Zoe Saldana thinks bullying from Hollywood helped Trump pull off his surprise win in November.

“We got cocky and became arrogant and we also became bullies,” Saldana told AFP. “We were trying to single out a man for all these things he was doing wrong… and that created empathy in a big group of people in America that felt bad for him and that are believing in his promises.”

Either way, there is no question about our President being a victim of Hollywood’s bullying, but some of them want it stopped.
Jennifer Aniston: “I and all the Trump supporter celebrities decided to make a pro-Trump company named “Celebrities For Trump,” Jennifer Aniston: “I and all the Trump supporter celebrities decided to make a pro-Trump company named “Celebrities For Trump,” Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Diplomat says aide heard Trump ask about "investigations" day after Ukraine call — live updates

November 13, 2019
Latest updates on the impeachment hearings

The House is holding the first public hearings of the impeachment probe, with two key diplomatic officials testifying before the Intelligence Committee.

Bill Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, told the committee he recently learned a member of his staff overheard President Trump asking about "the investigations" the day after his July 25 call with the president of Ukraine.
In that call, Mr. Trump urged the Ukrainian leader to investigate a company that had employed Joe Biden's son.

The top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine revealed new information about the events at the center of the House impeachment inquiry as the first open hearings before the House Intelligence Committee got underway Wednesday.

Bill Taylor, the chargé d'affaires at the U.S. embassy in Kiev, said in his opening statement that he recently learned about a conversation a member of his staff overheard between President Trump and Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the E.U. The conversation supposedly took place on July 26, the day after the president's now-infamous call with the Ukrainian president.

Taylor said the aide overheard the president ask Sondland about "the investigations." He also said Sondland told the aide that the president "cares more about the investigations of Biden" than U.S. policy toward Ukraine.

The staffer who overheard the conversation is David Holmes, a political officer in the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, three sources familiar with the matter told CBS News. Holmes is now expected to appear for a closed-door deposition on Capitol Hill on Friday.

Taylor is appearing alongside George Kent, the deputy assistant secretary of state for European and Eurasian Affairs. Both officials raised concerns about the central allegation in the impeachment inquiry -- that the Trump administration used U.S. military aid to Ukraine and the prospect of a White House visit to pressure the country to investigate the Biden family and events surrounding the 2016 election.

Democratic Chairman Adam Schiff opened the hearing by laying out the case against the president and saying the inquiry will "affect not only the future of this presidency but the future of the presidency itself."

Devin Nunes, the Republican ranking member, decried the proceedings as a "carefully orchestrated media smear campaign." Early in the hearing, Republican lawmakers tried to raise procedural questions to delay the proceedings and demand testimony from the whistleblower whose complaint sparked the inquiry.

The rapidly escalating investigation is just the fourth time in U.S. history that Congress has seriously considered impeaching a president. -- Stefan Becket

Source: CBSNEWS
Diplomat says aide heard Trump ask about "investigations" day after Ukraine call — live updates Diplomat says aide heard Trump ask about "investigations" day after Ukraine call — live updates Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

FLASH BACK: Obama tells Russia's Medvedev more flexibility after election

November 13, 2019
Obama, during talks in Seoul, urged Moscow to give him “space” until after the November ballot, and Medvedev said he would relay the message to incoming Russian president Vladimir Putin.

The unusually frank exchange came as Obama and Medvedev huddled together on the eve of a global nuclear security summit in the South Korean capital, unaware their words were being picked up by microphones as reporters were led into the room.

U.S. plans for an anti-missile shield have bedeviled relations between Washington and Moscow despite Obama’s “reset” in ties between the former Cold War foes. Obama’s Republican opponents have accused him of being too open to concessions to Russia on the issue.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney seized on Obama’s comment, calling it “alarming and troubling.”

“This is no time for our president to be pulling his punches with the American people,” Romney said in a campaign speech in San Diego.

As he was leaning toward Medvedev in Seoul, Obama was overheard asking for time - “particularly with missile defense” - until he is in a better position politically to resolve such issues.

“I understand your message about space,” replied Medvedev, who will hand over the presidency to Putin in May.

“This is my last election ... After my election I have more flexibility,” Obama said, expressing confidence that he would win a second term.

“I will transmit this information to Vladimir,” said Medvedev, Putin’s protégé and long considered number two in Moscow’s power structure.

The exchange, parts of it inaudible, was monitored by a White House pool of television journalists as well as Russian reporters listening live from their press center.

The United States and NATO have offered Russia a role in the project to create an anti-ballistic shield which includes participation by Romania, Poland, Turkey and Spain.

But Moscow says it fears the system could weaken Russia by gaining the capability to shoot down the nuclear missiles it relies on as a deterrent.

It wants a legally binding pledge from the United States that Russia’s nuclear forces would not be targeted by the system and joint control of how it is used.

The White House, initially caught off-guard by questions about the leaders’ exchange, later released a statement recommitting to implementing missile defense “which we’ve repeatedly said is not aimed at Russia” but also acknowledging election-year obstacles on the issue.

“Since 2012 is an election year in both countries, with an election and leadership transition in Russia and an election in the United States, it is clearly not a year in which we are going to achieve a breakthrough,” White House deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes said.

“Therefore, President Obama and President Medvedev agreed that it was best to instruct our technical experts to do the work of better understanding our respective positions, providing space for continued discussions on missile defense cooperation going forward,” he said.

Source: reuters
FLASH BACK: Obama tells Russia's Medvedev more flexibility after election FLASH BACK: Obama tells Russia's Medvedev more flexibility after election Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

New Trump call on Ukraine revealed at impeachment hearing

November 13, 2019

A top US diplomat told Congress on Wednesday a member of his staff had overheard Donald Trump pressing for a public Ukrainian investigation into a political rival in dramatic testimony on the first day of public impeachment hearings.

William Taylor, the acting US ambassador to Ukraine, told the House intelligence committee his staff member was informed that Mr Trump cared more about securing the probe than about Ukraine, which has been locked in a years-long war with Russia.

Mr Taylor, who appeared alongside George Kent, a senior state department official, gave testimony on Wednesday as Democrats opened a new public phase of their attempt to remove the US president from office. The case against him concerns a scheme described by numerous US officials that sought to leverage US official policy on Ukraine in order to secure personal benefits for Mr Trump.

Mr Taylor told the committee that an unnamed member of his staff had overheard a July 26 phone call between Mr Trump and Gordon Sondland, the US ambassador to the EU.

“The member of my staff could hear President Trump on the phone, asking Ambassador Sondland about ‘the investigations’,” Mr Taylor testified, referencing Mr Trump’s attempts to force Volodymyr Zelensky, the Ukrainian president, to announce probes relating to Joe Biden, a leading Democratic rival to Mr Trump, whose son Hunter was a director at a Ukrainian energy company.

“Ambassador Sondland told President Trump that the Ukrainians were ready to move forward,” said Mr Taylor, providing another possible direct link between Mr Trump and an alleged effort led by Rudy Giuliani, his personal attorney, that included withholding congressionally approved military aid to Ukraine in an effort to pressure Kyiv to investigate the Bidens.

The phone call described by Mr Taylor occurred at a restaurant and following a meeting Mr Sondland had held with a top adviser to the Ukrainian president. It came just a day after Mr Trump had spoken with Mr Zelensky in a July 25 phone call in which the US president pushed his Ukrainian counterpart to do him “a favour” when Mr Zelensky mentioned wanting to buy US weaponry. 

“The member of my staff asked Ambassador Sondland what President Trump thought about Ukraine,” Mr Taylor added. “Ambassador Sondland responded that President Trump cares more about the investigations of Biden, which Giuliani was pressing for.”

The hearing on Wednesday followed weeks of closed-door testimony and was the first test for Democrats as they try to build enough support for their case to chip away at Republican backing for the president in the House and Senate. So far, Republicans have all but uniformly stood fast behind Mr Trump.

Adam Schiff, the Democratic chair of the House intelligence committee who has led the impeachment efforts, cast the impeachment as a question of whether the US could remain a republic if it tolerated what he called Mr Trump’s abuse of power, extortion and obstruction of justice.

“Is that what Americans should now expect from their president? If this is not impeachable conduct, what is?” said Mr Schiff as he opened the hearing.

The testimony by Mr Taylor and Mr Kent largely mirrored previous closed-door depositions that they gave last month. In their statements, the officials emphasised the severity of the challenge Mr Zelensky faces as he attempts to fend off Russian aggression and clean up domestic corruption.

Mr Kent compared Ukraine’s conflict with Russia to the US war of independence, arguing that American assistance to Ukraine today was just as vital as European assistance for the US revolution against British rule.

“More than 13,000 Ukrainians have died on Ukrainian soil defending their territorial integrity and sovereignty from Russian aggression. American support in Ukraine’s own de facto war of independence has been critical in this regard,” he said.

Devin Nunes, the ranking Republican on the House intelligence committee, staked out the conservative defense of Mr. Trump as he decried the impeachment inquiry as merely an attempt by Democrats to smear the president after claiming for years that he was a Russian agent.

“They turned on a dime, and now claim the real malfeasance is Republicans’ dealings with Ukraine,” said Mr. Nunes. “We’re supposed to take these people at face value when they trot out a new batch of allegations.”


Mr. Trump is the fourth US president to face an impeachment inquiry. Richard Nixon was forced to resign before he was impeached when Republicans finally turned on him. Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton were both impeached but survived trials in the Senate.

Mr Taylor, Mr Kent, and others, have testified that both military aid to Ukraine and a White House meeting were withheld from Mr Zelensky until he announced investigations into Burisma, the energy company with ties to Hunter Biden, and into claims that Ukraine, rather than Russia, interfered in the 2016 US presidential election. The aid was eventually released, though Mr Schiff noted on Wednesday that occurred only after Congress began investigating.

In his testimony, Mr Taylor reiterated previous comments that the withholding of critical aid to benefit Mr Trump’s domestic political fortunes had damaged US efforts to support Ukraine and deter Russian aggression.

“It was counterproductive to all of what we had been trying to do. It was illogical, it could not be explained, it was crazy,” he said.

Source: FT
New Trump call on Ukraine revealed at impeachment hearing New Trump call on Ukraine revealed at impeachment hearing Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Taylor: New details on Trump, investigations at impeachment hearing: Live updates

November 13, 2019
The historic first public impeachment hearing began Wednesday as Democrats hoped to make their case to millions of Americans watching on television that President Donald Trump's conduct has been so serious he deserves to be removed from office.

After 16 closed-door interviews over the past month, Democrats have called two star witnesses to testify in open session: Ambassador William Taylor, the United States' top diplomat in Ukraine, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent, the State Department's top career official focused on Ukraine.

While, as of now, there is little expectation that the GOP-led Senate would convict Trump on any articles of impeachment, Democrats are striving to prove that Trump betrayed his oath of office by withholding military aid to Ukraine unless Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy initiated investigations to benefit Trump's "personal political interests in the United States" -- primarily through a corruption investigation into the Biden family. Republicans argue there was "no conditionality or evidence of pressure."

Taylor on Wednesday revealed new details about alleged comments by Trump about investigations.

Here is how the hearing is unfolding. Please refresh for updates.

1:24 p.m.

In analysis, ABC News’ MaryAlice Parks notes the Republican staff counsel, Steve Castor, has generally taken an aggressive and even accusatory stance toward the witnesses. That style, she says, might underline the notion that Republicans see the hearing as nothing but partisan, but it could backfire, too, if Republicans just look as if they are not playing ball.

Republicans seem to be arguing through these questions that the president or the White House was justified in having concerns about corruption. Parks says It’s worth remembering that Republicans, even more than Democrats, supported and voted for the aid package to Ukraine. Their public votes and statements at the time did not suggest they were looking for the aid to have more conditions.

12:42 p.m.

The committee returned starting with questions from Ranking Member Devin Nunes who continued to attack Democrats' handling of the inquiry.

ABC's Ben Siegel in the hearing room reports Nunes kicked off Republican questioning by railing against Democrats and accusing them of mischaracterizing the Trump-Zelenskiy July 25 call.

"What it actually shows is a pleasant exchange between two leaders," he said of the rough transcript. "Democrats aren't trying to find facts, they're trying to invent a narrative," Nunes said.

MORE LIVENEWS HERE
Taylor: New details on Trump, investigations at impeachment hearing: Live updates Taylor: New details on Trump, investigations at impeachment hearing: Live updates Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Trump 'cared more about investigations of Biden' than Ukraine policy, says impeachment witness – live

November 13, 2019
Republican counsel press witnesses on Hunter Biden

The counsel for Republican members of the House intelligence committee, Steve Castor, is pressing Bill Taylor and George Kent on Hunter Biden’s qualifications to join the board of the Ukrainian company Burisma.

Given their decades of experience in public service, Taylor and Kent are unsurprisingly unfamiliar with the resume of Biden, the son of former vice president Joe Biden. Kent and Taylor responded to a number of Castor’s questions about Biden’s qualifications by simply saying, “I don’t know.”

Kent has testified he raised concerns in 2015 about the appearance of a conflict of interest in the younger Biden’s work for Burisma, but he emphasized he had seen no evidence of US officials hesitating to examine the company because of Biden’s role on the board.

Follow LIVE NEWS HERE 
Trump 'cared more about investigations of Biden' than Ukraine policy, says impeachment witness – live Trump 'cared more about investigations of Biden' than Ukraine policy, says impeachment witness – live Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Opinion: Trump didn’t transform the economy, it’s mostly the same as it was under Obama - Market Watch

November 13, 2019
But the current president has used a lot of money from the Treasury as stimulus
Job growth since January 2017 has been just a bit slower than it was in the previous four years.

President Trump has not transformed the U.S. economy for the better, as he promised he would. It has not “exceeded expectations,” as he claimed in a speech Tuesday in New York.

Over the past four years since he began his political career, Trump has promised much faster growth and much higher stock markets. He’s promised that all the manufacturing and mining jobs would come back, and he told us that the tax cuts would put more than $4,000 in the pocket of every working family. On Tuesday he said that America was back on its way to dominating the global economy, because his policies had made America competitive again.

None of that has happened.

There is no shame in keeping the economy on gradual, upward glide path. It’s nearly impossible for a president’s policies to radically improve the U.S. economy, but there are many ways for a president to mess it up.

By most measures, the economy of today is little changed from the economy he inherited in early 2017. Job growth is a little slower, but gross domestic product (GDP) growth is a little faster.

And that’s really good news for Trump. There is no shame in keeping the economy on a gradual, upward glide path. It’s nearly impossible for a president’s policies to radically improve the U.S. economy, but there are many ways for a president to mess it up.

Despite Trump’s desperation to juice the economy with tax cuts, spending increases and interest-rate cuts from the Federal Reserve, there’s been only a modest and temporary uptick in the growth rate.

The potential growth rate of the economy, which he promised to transform with smart pro-business polices such tax cuts and deregulation, hasn’t budged an inch.
Boosted by fiscal stimulus, U.S. GDP has averaged 2.6% under Donald Trump vs. 2.4% in Barack Obama’s last four years in office.
Over the 11 quarters since he was elected, U.S. real GDP has averaged 2.6% per year, not the 4%, 5% or even 6% that Trump vowed. By way of comparison, GDP averaged 2.4% over the final 16 quarters of Barack Obama’s presidency. All of the extra growth (and more) since 2017 was provided by a fiscal boost from tax cuts and spending increases as Republican lawmakers turned from austerity budgets under Obama to stimulus under Trump.

In Obama’s final four years, government austerity subtracted an average of 0.5 percentage point from GDP each year, according to calculations by the Brookings Institution’s Hutchins Center.

In a counterfactual world assuming neutral fiscal policy, GDP growth would have averaged 2.9% from 2013 to 2017. Since Trump took office, the stance of fiscal policy has flipped, with fiscal stimulus now adding to growth: an average of 0.6 percentage point this year alone. Excluding the boost from tax cuts and spending, GDP would have averaged 2.4% since 2017.

Throw money at the economy

In other words, there’s nothing special about the acceleration in growth. It’s simply a matter of throwing a lot of money at the economy.

Trump managed to squeeze a little more growth out of the economy, but at the cost of hundreds of billions of dollars from the Treasury. That cost might be worth it if the tax cut had laid the groundwork for higher economic growth later due to large investments in private businesses and public works. It didn’t.

Job growth, which is probably the single most important indicator of the economy’s strength, has slipped slightly, from about 217,000 per month to 189,000. That’s still a respectable number, and there’s no reason for Trump’s economic advisers to lie and make up statistics to try to make it seem bigger.

Unfortunately for Trump, the Bureau of Labor Statistics is likely to revise that job growth down to around 175,000 as part of its annual benchmarking. That’s still a good number, one to be proud of.
President Trump loves to brag about the stock market, but it hasn’t been any better than it was in the previous four years.

Trump has often boasted of the big gains in the stock market under his watch, but, as of midday, the S&P 500 Index SPX, +0.12%  had almost exactly matched the trend growth rate from 2013 to 2017. And Trump has put investors through an emotional ringer with his on-again, off-again trade negotiations and surprising tweets.

Meanwhile, the nagging, structural problems of America’s economy have not been addressed.

What he hasn’t fixed
Trump hasn’t fixed health care. He hasn’t fixed immigration. He hasn’t fixed infrastructure. He hasn’t fix the savings deficit, the current account deficit or the budget deficit.

His environmental, labor and immigration problems are a slow-rolling disaster that will reverberate in our economy for decades. His deregulation policies are heavy-handed and counter-productive. His corruption of American standards of ethical conduct could be long-lasting. The dogmatic judges he’s packed the courts with will be a negative for the economy and our democracy.

Trump hasn’t done anything to address inequality of opportunity, wealth or income. Nor has he done anything to promote growth and opportunity in left-behind regions, such as the abandoned factory towns of the Midwest, the South and the Great Plains. His idea of farm policy is to put every farmer on the dole.

Let’s give Trump the credit he deserves. He hasn’t made America’s economy any greater than it was before, and, by many real-time measures, it’s no worse. And 10 years into an economic expansion, that’s no small feat.

The festering problems in the economy, however, must be dealt with quickly by the next president and Congress, who will have a short window of opportunity to address climate change, inequality, and the lack of trust between the governed and the government.

SOURCE: marketwatch
Opinion: Trump didn’t transform the economy, it’s mostly the same as it was under Obama - Market Watch Opinion: Trump didn’t transform the economy, it’s mostly the same as it was under Obama - Market Watch Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Schiff And Pelosi Unable To Say What Trump Did Wrong In ‘Impeachapalooza’ Stunt

November 13, 2019
Democrats’ impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump is proceeding faster than ever than before, but it seems like not even the Democrats themselves are able to catch up with what they had in mind as they struggle to justify their reasons to remove the president from office.

Fox News contributor Chad Pergram in an exchange with House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) asked for clarification on the term “impeachment resolution,” but received no straight answer.

When asked by Pergram if he was reluctant to refer the process to remove President Trump from office an “impeachment resolution” due to the possibility of the public perceiving “this stage as impeaching the president” even though Democrats are “obviously several steps short of that,” Hoyer said he wishes to be cautious about his word choices.

“I want to be very careful in my verbiage because I’ve found it repeatedly misconstrued by those of you who either write the stories or the headlines,” Hoyer responded. “I want to be very precise. We are continuing the process of determining whether ‘high crimes and misdemeanors’ have been committed by the president of the United States, which would justify, at that point in time, proceeding with articles of impeachment.”

The “impeachapalooza,” as described by Pergram due to the word games Democrats adopted since they are unable to establish wrongdoing by the president, was initiated by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and currently being led by House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.).

Pelosi refuses to call the procedure of removing President Trump an “impeachment resolution” but at the same time announced that a House vote be held to formalize the procedure to “establish parameters” for the investigation last month, Pergram wrote.

Meanwhile Schiff turned the blame on GOP lawmakers for requesting a fairer process, claiming “they can’t defend the president’s conduct” despite Democrats also failing to show evidence any wrongdoing by President Trump.

Pergram also noted that a number of moderate and conservative Democrats would rather not discuss impeaching the president.

“They’d rather discuss health care and infrastructure issues, maybe adoption of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement [USMCA] trade package,” Pergram wrote. “These [Democrats] seemed to know the less they’d have to deal with impeachment, the better off they were.”

The U.S. Mexico Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA) is President Trump’s modernized trilateral trade deal that aims to provide thousands of new jobs and give U.S. duty-free access to Mexican and Canadian markets.

Penn Live contributor Marc A. Scaringi in an opinion column rebuked Pelosi’s impeachment inquiry as “a joke” for denying President Trump “basic rules of fairness” and failing to establish the “crimes” he was accused of committing.

“Over a month into the ‘official’ impeachment inquiry, and many months into the unofficial one, Democrats still have not shown us the crime,” Scaringi wrote, citing Pelosi’s appearance on Stephen Colbert’s late-night show earlier this month where she tried to explain why she is trying to remove President Trump from office.

Pelosi, in response to Colbert’s question, “giggled, laughed, and repeatedly said it’s ‘about the Constitution,’ while boasting that she’s ‘throwing a punch for the children.’”

Scaringi pointed out that despite Pelosi solemnly stating, “No one is above the law,” she was unable to provide “evidence of any crime [by the president].”

“She’s got nothing,” Scaringi added. “But her impeachment inquiry, although a joke and political stunt to her, is being taken with the utmost seriousness by the president’s 62 million loyal supporters.”

At the heart of the impeachment inquiry is a July 25 phone call between President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, where Democrats rushed to assess whether military aid to Ukraine was withheld to pressure Ukraine into investigating former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter.

But President Trump firmly denied any wrongdoing, calling the phone call “good” and “normal” as he urged individuals to “read the transcript” before slamming him for having done anything wrong.

Zelenskiy too explained that there was “no blackmail” and that there was no pressure for him to get involved in American politics.

The aid to Ukraine too was eventually released without condition.
Schiff And Pelosi Unable To Say What Trump Did Wrong In ‘Impeachapalooza’ Stunt Schiff And Pelosi Unable To Say What Trump Did Wrong In ‘Impeachapalooza’ Stunt Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5

Joe Biden Snubs Trump When Offering Congratulations for al-Baghdadi Raid

November 13, 2019
Joe Biden snubbed President Donald Trump when issuing a congratulatory statement on Sunday upon news that U.S. forces had killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

“I congratulate our special forces, our intelligence community, and all our brave military professionals on delivering justice to the terrorist Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi,” the former vice president said shortly after the White House announced it had successfully killed the ISIS leader during an overnight raid in Syria. “It is thanks to their courage and relentless determination to carry out its mission that ISIS has suffered a vital loss.”

Biden, in his short statement, followed the trend of other presidential candidates, such as Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) and former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, by not once mentioning Trump. The snub came despite the fact that Trump gave the order to go after al-Baghdadi, who led ISIS since 2014 and was responsible for most of the group’s terrorist activities in the past few years.

The president confirmed on Sunday that al-Baghdadi was killed during a daring nighttime raid on a compound in northwestern Syria’s Idlib Provence. The raid, which was led by a group of U.S. special forces, killed a “large number” of ISIS forces, culminating in al-Baghdadi being cornered in a tunnel beneath the compound. Instead of being captured by the approaching U.S. forces, the ISIS leader detonated a suicide vest killing himself and three children.

“He died like a dog, he died like a coward,” Trump said when announcing the news. “The world is now a much safer place.”

No U.S. troops were wounded in the operation, according to the president, except for “a beautiful” and “talented dog” that was part of the canine unit brought along for the mission.

Biden, in his own statement on Sunday, seemed to agree with the president, even if he refused to mention him by name when he said the “world is better and safer without” al-Baghdadi. Biden’s reluctance to congratulate the president for successfully taking out the ISIS leader stands in stark contrast to a message Trump sent to then-President Barack Obama upon the death of Osama bin Laden in May 2011.

SOURCE: breitbart 
Joe Biden Snubs Trump When Offering Congratulations for al-Baghdadi Raid Joe Biden Snubs Trump When Offering Congratulations for al-Baghdadi Raid Reviewed by Chimezie Ozofor on November 13, 2019 Rating: 5
Powered by Blogger.